Photograph by Bill Knight

Photograph by Bill Knight

Movement Directing

Creating a physical landscape in a piece allows an audience to get lost in the time and place of a production. Whether this is through natural pedestrian movement punctuated with dynamic precision, or via a formalised, structured choreographed language, a world is formed through following characters as they move from point A to point B - it is first the what, and then becomes the how. A stage can be transformed through the physical architecture within the space. We watch the shapes and structures that are created by bodies to inform relationships, mood and temperature. Culture and class are defined by how the body is held; how it shifts and gestures. Love, hate, joy, despair are expressed through the sensitivity of the skin, muscle and bone. Exploring through play and trial and error, as a movement director I collaborate with the director and performers to devise a world for the performers to live in, and for an audience to escape to.

Movement as a language.

Teaching

Caitlin is a movement teacher at Guildhall School of Music and Drama and the Royal Academy of Music on the Vocal courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. She also leads private one-to-one sessions with singers and musicians focusing on building body awareness, connectivity and confidence, as well as exploring specific character roles and texts. 

Working with the body is an important facet of a performers' learning. Throughout sessions I aim to build a palate of exercises, stretches and movement phrases that encourage openness and confidence when practicing and performing; hopefully allowing each individual to feel confident in expressing themselves through movement. The exploration of personal physicality is unique to everyone, it is an endless investigation in how we can communicate alongside text and music.  I touch on flexibility, strength, precision, focus, dexterity and fluidity, plus specific dance forms such as ballroom, contemporary and ballet, while bringing attention to how the body is a tool for storytelling in performance.

 Photograph by James Glossop

Photograph by James Glossop